HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_TITLE

HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_SUBTITLE

c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus
  • c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus

c1937 Cased British Naval Gimballed Brass Husun Pelorus

Price:

£380.00


Product Description

A rare pre-WWII British brass Pelorus, complete with its gimbals, in its storage case.

The Pelorus is wholly made of brass and is maker marked HUSUN, which was the brand name for Henry Hughes & Son. The Pelorus has a heavy lead weight on a vertical shaft below the compass rose, to ensure that the Pelorus remains horizontal in heavy seas. The rotating circular disc is graduated in 360 degrees for the Northern Hemisphere and can be inverted if sailing in the Southern Hemisphere. Because of the weight underneath it, rests in quite a deep mahogany case, with slots to accommodate the gimbal attachments. It has a folding brass sight system that rests on the compass disc and rotates at will. The condition is very good, however it looks like it may have been a one-off or prototype, as we cannot find another example and the piece looks more handmade than the standard of machining you expect from Henry Hughes products.

A pelorus is somewhat a rarity. It was invented in 1854, by Lt. Friend of the Royal Navy, who applied for a patent for his version which he named the Pelorus, after Hannibal's pilot. The device had existed in other cultures from earlier dates. In general, this instrument provides only a relative bearing, as it does not have any direction input. So, when you set it up to 000 degrees parallel to the ship’s centre line, you sight it on a navigation mark - you find the bearing or direction of the mark. Then you must correct it with a compass heading. If the ship is on a steady course, you may set up the pelorus to the course and you will have true bearings. With the invention of Gyrocompasses, they became less important. It is also used for compensating compasses.

Size pelorus: 28 x 24 x 28 cm (11 x 9 ½ x 11 inches)
Size case: 29.5 x 29.5 x 21.5 cm (11 5/8 x 11 5/8 x 8 ½ inches)
Weight: 9kg

Shipping

  • Shipping Weight: 11kgs
  • Worldwide shipping costs can be estimated by adding the item to your basket and clicking the Shipping Estimator.