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Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad
  • Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad

Antique German Judaica Chaised Leather Coin Purse Carlsbad

Price:

£800.00


Product Description

This remarkable piece of leatherwork, hailing from a city that no longer exists, and made by a people who no longer live there, is a sad reminder of the Jewish communities that once inhabited central Europe. It’s interesting that the Stars of David, the most overtly Judaic symbols are on the fold and the clasp, where they are least conspicuous. The ornamentation is fascinating, unique and evidence of an ancient Civilisation, that despite overwhelming odds, managed to survive and retain its differences.


The inside of the purse bears two stamps, one for “J Weigman” and the other for “Adolf Rosenfeld | Carlsbad.” We believe Weigman is the maker and that Rosenfeld is the retailer. In the middle, the wallet features a semi-secret compartment, lined with supple kid leather and opened by brass clasp.

Little can be found of Adolf Rosenfeld, though it seems that he was a prominent member of Carlsbad’s Jewish community. He is mentioned in Mirjam Zadoff’s The Lost Worlds of Jewish Spa Culture, where in an open letter to the city authorities, co-authored with Rabbi Ignaz Ziegler, he is described as the “deputy head of the [Jewish] Community.”

The history of the Jews of Carlsbad, the city beloved by Beethoven and Brahms, is a fascinating one, beginning with the reforms of 1848, when they began to settle there and acquire property. In 1868, the community was allowed to form a congregation, which grew rapidly, and by 1877, a synagogue able to accommodate 2,000 worshippers was built. Ignaz Ziegler officiated as rabbi from 1888 to 1938. He fled in the autumn of 1938 and died in Jerusalem a decade later. According to the Jewish Virtual Library, “Carlsbad became popular among Jews as a resort and a rendezvous of matchmakers and as a meeting place for rabbis and communal leaders from Eastern Europe. The 12th and 13th Zionist Congresses were held there in 1921 and 1923.”

As the Jewish population of Carlsbad grew, anti-Semitism did the same. By 1910, a correspondent from the Osterreichesche Wochenschrift (Austrian Weekly) observed a total "separation of society" into Christians and Jews”, where “almost all association in Carlsbad have excluded Jews, and they are barred from entry to any of their amusements and events.”

The Jewish Virtual Library recalls how the “Jewish population numbered 100 in 1868” rising to “1600 in 1910” and peaking at “2650 in 1921”, before declining to 2,120 in 1930. After the German annexation of the Sudetenland in 1938, “all but four Jews” remained in Carlsbad.

Size: (Unfolded): 16.5 x 14 x 1.5cm
Size (Folded): 16.5 x 7.5 x 1.5cm
Weight: 95g

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