HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_TITLE

HEADING_CONTACT_US_POPUP_SUBTITLE

c700 BC Ancient Egyptian Paste Eye of Horus Talisman
  • c700 BC Ancient Egyptian Paste Eye of Horus Talisman
  • c700 BC Ancient Egyptian Paste Eye of Horus Talisman
  • c700 BC Ancient Egyptian Paste Eye of Horus Talisman

c700 BC Ancient Egyptian Paste Eye of Horus Talisman

Price:

£250.00


Product Description

A beautiful, finely made Ancient Egyptian Paste ceramic (sometimes referred erroneously to as Faience) ‘Eye of Horus’ Talisman.

The paste is a turquoise green colour, with a vitreous texture and appearance and finely engraved features, with the pupil being made as a nearly black lenticular disc. The Eye is of the Late Period, dating from around 700 – 500 BC. Condition is good, with minimal wear, for its age. There is a small lower tab broken off. There is a hole running through its length for threading it.

The Eye of Horus amulet was the second most popular of the seventy-five known types of talisman, after the scarab beetle. The gods Osiris and Seth were put in charge of Egypt, but while Osiris’ half of the country flourished, Seth’s turned to desert. A jealous Seth murdered Osiris and took his throne, but Osiris’ wife, his sister Isis, kept their son Horus safe until he was old enough to avenge his father. Finally, after a long series of battles, Horus defeated Seth and became king of Egypt, but not before one of his eyes was torn out by Seth, who ripped it to pieces in his anger. It was restored by the god Thoth, after which it was called Wedjat, ‘The Whole One’ and became a symbol of healing. In time, the Eye of Horus became one of the most popular amulets, worn by the Egyptians for protection and good health. Most surviving examples are made of Egyptian paste and fired in a clay mould. The amulets were placed on mummies or in parts of buildings. Various patterns exist; some early examples bear projections representing the body legs and tail of the sky god. A right eye is taken to symbolise the sun, a left eye (such as this) the moon., and such udjats (or wedjats) frequently occur in facing pairs. The symbol may be interpreted as providing eyes for the dead - the means for the mummified deceased to see the rising sun, the symbol of resurrection.

Size:
Weight: