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Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures
  • Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures
  • Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures
  • Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures
  • Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures
  • Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures

Attributed Paul Sandby Market Gin Lady Watercolour Caricatures

Price:

£2,000.00


Product Description

A curious pair of Georgian watercolour caricatures, by Paul Sandby (1731-1809) and dating from the middle of the 18th century.

The watercolours depict a ragged market lady with a pitcher of gin and a small glass vial. Her fortunes turn with her drink: when full she smiles merrily, and when depleted she is crestfallen. The portraits are reminiscent of Hogarth’s Beer Street and Gin lane, where the contrasting effects of drinking gin and beer are shown vividly in two parallel streets. A powerful piece of social commentary, the print would pre-empt the Gin Act of 1751, which sought to reduce the consumption of spirits in the capital.

The caricatures come from a long artistic tradition of depicting urban poverty in Georgian Britain. Such work would vary from the early concerns of Hogarth and Sandby, to the withering appraisals of Thomas Rowlandson, as the menace of Napoleon and the French Revolution loomed. Not until the security of the Victorian era, would it be safe again to portray sympathetically the woes of the urban poor.

The back of the frame bears an old ink-signed label. The majority is illegible, aside from the date “17th April 59” (1759). The rest is likely the names of to whom it was addressed. Sandby would begin his series ‘Cries of London’ the following year in 1760, after his sketches of Edinburgh after the Jacobite Uprising proved popular. The caricatures are very similar to Paul Sandby’s portrait of an ‘Old Market Woman’, held in the Yale Centre for British Art. The squat face is also used in his sketch ‘Will you buy my Crabs come buy my Crabs’ in the National Gallery of Scotland

The watercolours are generally in fine condition having been framed and glazed. One shows areas of water damage and a small tear to its bottom left corner.

Size of Frame: 34 x 27 x 2cm
Size of Picture: 24.5 x 17.5cm
Weight: 1376g

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