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c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO
  • c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO
  • c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO
  • c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO
  • c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO
  • c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO

c1840 Shoulder Belt Plate for 43rd Foot Monmouthshire Senior NCO

Price:

£750.00


Product Description

A very nice looking and impressive size original early Victorian British Army Shoulder Belt Plate for a senior non-commissioned officer of the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry).

The plate is unusual in that it is a multi-piece construction, as an officer’s version would be, but instead of having the crown and horn in silvered metal, it is all brass. Other ranks plates would be a one piece construction with reverse stamped emblem or engraved design. The rectangular plate has the corners cut, making it a long octagonal. The crown, the horn with the hanging straps and the number 43 are of slightly rougher construction. The details of the crown and horn have been partly worn through years of polishing. The reverse shows the plate is held on to the belt by 2 rounded bolts (1 missing) and 2 spade tabs. The crown and horn are affixed by 3 hole lugs through which runs a bent steel wire. Given that the 43 numbered belt plate only existed till 1855, makes it a rare item. Officer versions do turn up, now and then, whereas other ranks’ are rarer and this particular design is the only one we’ve seen. Very nice item.

The 43rd Regiment was raised at Winchester by Colonel Thomas Fowke as Thomas Fowke's Regiment of Foot in 1741. The regiment's was on garrison duties at Menorca in 1742. It was numbered 54th Regiment of Foot from 1747 until 1751 when it became the 43rd Regiment of Foot. In 1803, the 43rd, the 52nd and the 95th Rifles became the first Corps of Light Infantry and formed the Light Brigade at Shorncliffe in Kent under the command of Major-General John Moore. The regiment was re-titled as the 43rd (Monmouthshire) Regiment of Foot (Light Infantry). The 43rd was part of a force led by Sir Arthur Wellesley which in 1807 captured Copenhagen and the entire Danish fleet. The regiment served in Ireland from 1819 to 1823 and then at Gibraltar from 1823 to 1830. Following a period in England the 43rd returned to Canada in 1836 and took part in the suppression of the Rebellions of 1837. In December 1837, in severe weather conditions, the regiment marched from Fredericton to Quebec a distance of 370 miles of many forests, frozen rivers and mountainous terrain in a period of eighteen days. The march received much attention in Canada and the Duke of Wellington expressed his high admiration for the arduous undertaking the 43rd had completed. The 43rd were sent to South Africa for service in the Eighth Xhosa War in 1851. In 1852 a detachment from the regiment departed Simon's Town aboard the troopship HMS Birkenhead bound for Port Elizabeth. At two o'clock in the morning on 28 February 1852, the ship struck rocks at Danger Point. The troops assembled on deck and allowed the women and children to board the lifeboats first, but then stood firm as the ship sank when told by officers that jumping overboard and swimming to the lifeboats would mostly likely upset those boats and endanger the civilian passengers. 357 men drowned. The bravery and discipline shown by British troops, which included the 43rd, received much publicity in England and abroad. King Frederick of Prussia ordered that the story of the bravery shown during the sinking of the troopship be read out to each regiment of his army as an example of devotion to duty.

Size: 10.2 x 15.2 cm (4 x 6 inches)
Weight: 231 g

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